The variety is literally endless as they give the liberty to the designer to create something new at every stage of its completion, because of the fact that it is a combination of a large number of small-sized tattoos, rather than being one large and continuous one. The variation can be based not only on the elements of design, but also colors used in creating sleeve style tattoos. Some designers may make these designs in conventional colors such as black and grey, while others can go for more vibrant colors to make sure that the tattoo attracts every person who sees it and definitely demands a second look.

If you've heard anything about laser removal, it's probably that it's insanely painful. I mean, if I had a nickel for every time I've heard, "Doesn't that hurt even more than actually getting the tattoos?" I'd be rich. (OK, I would have enough money to buy a medium iced coffee at Pret.) But while there's plenty of info on what to consider before getting a tattoo (and pages on pages of enticing inspo), there still isn't a whole lot of discussion surrounding the dark side of ink jobs: What happens if you grow to no longer love that little shooting star or random Latin phrase (ahem, see below)? I'm only about halfway through the process, but I've picked up plenty of tips along the way. So to do you all a solid, I put together a list of everything I've learned.
Of course, geometric tattoos branch into the realms of sacred geometry, tribal history, and deep personal significance, so it's always worth doing some research before committing to a lifetime of ink, and the commentaries that accompany it. Personally, I'm of the opinion that whenever possible, it's best to have a custom piece designed for you, or to design your own work, if you're comfortable doing so (with the aid of your tattoo artist, if they're willing to help, because they're aware of what will and won't work on certain areas of the body, as well as what they're capable of creating at a professional level). Coming in with expectations to copy or rip off another artist's design will more than likely upset your tattoo artist, which you definitely want to avoid. Because like most professionals, your tattoo artist has integrity, and likely holds herself/himself to a very high standard — which usually includes respect for their work, and the work of other industry professionals.
More people than you think might expect to spend their daily lives deconstructing the visual world according to spatial relationships and simplified shapes. Architects, engineers, and graphic designers; game designers, photographers, and event coordinators; archaeologists, mathematicians, and scientists — all of these professions and more utilize basic geometry (and often, the golden ratio, despite its aesthetic purity coming under speculation) daily to categorize, design, and contribute to the world around them. Truth is, you visualize the world this way, whether or not you're conscious of it. So, if you're drawn to the way tattoo artists pay homage to nature and mathematics, there's good reason for it. And don't worry, you're not alone.
“I’m so happy I went to Eraser Clinic for my tattoo removal. The initial consultation was free and I appreciated their honesty in explaining and answering my millions of questions. The laser technician was so nice and made me feel very comfortable, I was even laughing at bit during my session. It did hurt, but it was over in like 10 seconds. I liked all of the reminder and follow-up calls/texts. Great value and a great experience.”
These types of tattoos have become popular because, besides being perfectly symmetrical and gorgeous, they can also carry a deep symbolic significance. In geometry, different shapes can be associated with different elements present in nature – the cube symbolizes the earth, the tetrahedron symbolizes fire, the icosahedron symbolizes water, and so on. In some cultures, it’s believed that having these tattoos on certain areas of the body can have a healing effect, can restore good health, or can provide a sense of balance. Plus, they’re stunning, which we’re sure you’ll recognize once you glance over our extensive collection of sacred geometry tattoos below.
Your next consideration should be where you want your tattoo. Is it something you want to show off, easily conceal or reveal, or a more personal project that only you will see? Your body will be your canvas, so it’s important to choose a portion of your anatomy appropriate to your art. Back pieces are exceptionally well suited to larger concepts, which you may want to expand at some future date. If you just want to start small, the bicep or the forearm are ideal for more contained show pieces, discrete emblems that can be worked into “sleeves”—either half or full—at a later time.
We’ll start with this ghost design. In recent years there has been more of a movement towards smaller, minimalist style tattoos, rather than the traditional ink heavy ones. It also shows that girls are not limited to only getting ‘girly tattoos’. The cartoon ghost is a fun, whilst not been too spooky. Smaller tattoos are also becoming more popular nowadays as they are more affordable and often people can get a few smaller tattoos for the same cost as a bigger one. Not to mention they are also a lot easier to hide/conceal should you need to for work.
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