The idea to get a tattoo sometimes comes unconsciously and is not well thought through. It happens, that a tattoo comes out not the way you expected it to be or the location is not the best and your boss gives you a hard time instead of a promotion. No matter what the reason, you need to remove a tattoo, the question you face is – how? Here are the modern ways to help men in such situations:
Remember how we said society is more accepting of sleeve tattoos now? While it is true, that doesn’t mean everyone is fine with them. For example, the United States Marines Corp. changed their policy in April 2007 to ban tattoo sleeves unless you got them before enlisting. There are also still plenty of employers who have a “no visible tattoo” policy but require a short-sleeve shirt uniform, which means you’re out of luck.
Remember how we said society is more accepting of sleeve tattoos now? While it is true, that doesn’t mean everyone is fine with them. For example, the United States Marines Corp. changed their policy in April 2007 to ban tattoo sleeves unless you got them before enlisting. There are also still plenty of employers who have a “no visible tattoo” policy but require a short-sleeve shirt uniform, which means you’re out of luck.

Tattoo sleeves are badass and totally eye-catching -- no one can deny that. Turning an entire arm or leg into a work of art requires some serious commitment and love for ink. In fact, we'd go so far as to argue that our arms or legs are the perfect canvas to be transformed into a piece of art. Our limbs are incredibly easy to hide, but also super easy to show off, arguably making tattoo sleeves the best spot to get inked. 
“The big misconception with tattoo removal is that it’s an eraser,” Sherrif F. Ibrahim, M.D.,, an associate professor in the department of dermatology at the University of Rochester, tells SELF. But it’s not that simple. “It’s a process,” he says. Sometimes, complete removal of a tattoo can take one or two years, with treatments occurring every 6, 8, or 12 weeks. Plus, it’s not like getting your eyebrows waxed—it’s an invasive procedure that costs hundreds of dollars a session. Lasers remove tattoos by blowing up pigment molecules into tiny pieces, which are then cleared away by an immune system response. Healing from laser treatment isn’t always a walk in the park, either. “The laser breaks the skin’s surface, so you have bleeding, you have swelling, and you have pain after the treatment,” says Dr. Ibrahim.

Laser tattoo removal is uncomfortable - many patients say it is worse than getting the tattoo. The pain is often described to be similar to that of hot oil on the skin, or a "snap" from an elastic band. Depending on the patient's pain threshold, and while some patients may forgo anesthesia altogether, most patients will require some form of local anesthesia. Pre-treatment might include the application of an anesthetic cream under occlusion for 45 to 90 minutes or cooling by ice or cold air prior to the laser treatment session. A better method is complete anesthesia which can be administered locally by injections of 1% to 2% lidocaine with epinephrine.

When it comes to a geometric tattoo it focuses more on shapes and patterns that are found in the natural world. Some of them even have ties to religious iconography and the history behind it. To say that geometric tattoos are scared however is a very broad term because there are so many different artists around the world who have different interpretations of the tattoos.
Tattooing has been around for centuries, it’s considered to be an ancient art. Back in the day tattooing was considered a sacred tradition, it wasn’t just for flare like it is nowadays. Tattooing trends com and go, not every style has staying power. But one particular tattoo that seems to just grow in popularity is the geometric tattoos. Probably because they are considered to be sacred, a tattoo with true meaning. Plus, you can’t beat the fact that they are really cool looking tattoos.
Sleeve tattoos have been definitively transformed in the last decade, and now they regularly feature a conglomerate of art styles that border on the edge of optic illusions and meta curiosities. Extensive art pieces can be executed with a direct focus on sublime stimulation. Highly detailed tribal symbols often mesh with futuristic machinery and pop culture icons. Flesh and sinew can be replicated to make it seem like the skin is practically non-existent.
He is also aware of the ways Instagram impacts the tattoo community and the spread of trends like sacred geometry. "Without a doubt social media has everything to do with clients — first timers in particular — having access to researching and choosing an artist," he said. "Instagram has been the single most powerful tool I've had access to for marketing as an artist all along."

I wanted to do a three quarters sleeve, and had ideas of what I wanted, but had no idea how to put it all together. This was essentially my first time getting seriously inked, and even though I was clueless about how to make it known exactly what I wanted, Viet listened to me and my ideas and gave his professional input and suggestions on how to make it come together and look as amazing on my body as it could possibly be. Viet did an absolutely amazing job and I couldn't be happier with the work that he did. He's an artist in every aspect.

Tattooing has been around for centuries, it’s considered to be an ancient art. Back in the day tattooing was considered a sacred tradition, it wasn’t just for flare like it is nowadays. Tattooing trends com and go, not every style has staying power. But one particular tattoo that seems to just grow in popularity is the geometric tattoos. Probably because they are considered to be sacred, a tattoo with true meaning. Plus, you can’t beat the fact that they are really cool looking tattoos.
If you know that eventually you want a full sleeve, then Gualteros advises coming up with the full-arm design ahead of time, instead of starting off with just a few sporadic tattoo ideas. This is true for both tribal-style tattoos as well as a series of more random, disconnected ones. “When you’re working with a blank canvas, you can really think through the entire composition to make it cohesive,” he says. “If you’re working with existing tattoos, you just have to try to make it as seamless as possible.”
But that’s how it is! Sure, from a distance the sleeves make them look tough, but these guys know better than anyone how to ink up their arm in a strategic, meaningful way. Think of all the factors they've got to juggle: Choosing an artist can realize their vision, putting together the cash, sitting for all those hours, and then caring for the new tats so they don't need any touch ups—all over the course of weeks, months or years!

1. Consider a doctor. I'd previously had one tattoo zapped at a spa (I was living in small-town Canada where there weren't plastic surgery offices or dermatologists), where an aesthetician used an outdated heat laser that ended up burning and scarring my skin. This time around, I'm having treatments done by Dr. John F. Adams at the New York Dermatology Group, where everything is done under medical supervision. I suggest you find your own doctor by asking friends, editors (shameless plug), and even by stopping people that you see with removal in process—which, yes, I have done.
55. If you are looking for a sleeve tattoo then why not consider the geometry shape version of it. Throughout different areas of the arms there is a separate yet completely harmonious design that complements the one before it. There is so much detail to this tattoo that you can’t help but want to investigate it. There isn’t even any need for color in this tattoo though you could certainly make it pop with some vibrant colors.

Historically finger tattoos get a bit of a bad wrap. Typically they use to be reserved for bikers and gang members, they also were considered a bit of a faux pas if you wanted to get a respectable job. Nowadays however they are more common place and socially acceptable. The traditional finger tattoos were to get “LOVE” on one hand and then “HATE” across the other knuckles, this was a design that was popularized by movie characters. Generally people will get either two four letter words across their knuckles or one eight or ten letter word across both of their hands.

×

What Are you Looking for?

Tattoo Ideas and Designs Sacred Geometry Tattoo Removal

sacred geometry tattoo
tattoo removal
tattoo ideas sacred geometry tattoo tattoo removal

tattoo sleeves