One of the most popular choices among full tattoo sleeve ideas and designs is the original Maori tattoo designs, which feature common tribal elements like – spirals. These tattoos are gaining importance because of simple design and use of free space. The design of the tattoo looks amazing and eye-catchy because when the shapes interact they complement each other.

“After just 2 treatments I am astonished by how much my tattoo has faded. The clinic is very clean and everyone is welcoming and friendly. My technician was professional and informative about the procedure. Of course I was a little nervous, but he allayed all of those fears and more. He chatted with me calmly during the treatment and I was amazed that after only about 15 seconds I was all done. The entire experience was fast, thorough, informative, and reassuring. The second visit was exactly the same, and I have no problem to recommend Eraser Clinic to anyone who needs tattoo removal in Dallas.”
Tattoo sleeves are badass and totally eye-catching -- no one can deny that. Turning an entire arm or leg into a work of art requires some serious commitment and love for ink. In fact, we'd go so far as to argue that our arms or legs are the perfect canvas to be transformed into a piece of art. Our limbs are incredibly easy to hide, but also super easy to show off, arguably making tattoo sleeves the best spot to get inked. 
The variety is literally endless as they give the liberty to the designer to create something new at every stage of its completion, because of the fact that it is a combination of a large number of small-sized tattoos, rather than being one large and continuous one. The variation can be based not only on the elements of design, but also colors used in creating sleeve style tattoos. Some designers may make these designs in conventional colors such as black and grey, while others can go for more vibrant colors to make sure that the tattoo attracts every person who sees it and definitely demands a second look.

Your next consideration should be where you want your tattoo. Is it something you want to show off, easily conceal or reveal, or a more personal project that only you will see? Your body will be your canvas, so it’s important to choose a portion of your anatomy appropriate to your art. Back pieces are exceptionally well suited to larger concepts, which you may want to expand at some future date. If you just want to start small, the bicep or the forearm are ideal for more contained show pieces, discrete emblems that can be worked into “sleeves”—either half or full—at a later time.
If you know you eventually want a sleeve, or if you’re going full-sleeve right out the gate, then Gualteros recommends starting at the shoulder. From there, you’ll work your way down the arm. “If someone came to me and let me do whatever I wanted, I’d start from the top with something that fits the body,” he says. “Something that doesn’t look like a sticker on the arm, then bring it down and fill it in.” Alternatively, he notes that some of his customers and fellow artists prefer to start at the wrist and work their way up, but on the same principle: By starting on one end, you aren’t guessing where to place everything else. Instead, you’re moving up or down the sleeve and filling it in with some kind of order.
To help you, at least a little, we got some design suggestions from Sean Dowdell, co-owner of Club Tattoo, which has locations in Las Vegas, as well as Mesa, Tempe, and Scottsdale, AZ. Dowdell's team has inked celebs like Slash, Miley Cyrus, Amar’e Stoudemire, Blake Shelton, Steve Aoki, and Keith Sweat. We asked him for suggestions on the most popular types of tattoos today—and ones that will look good with time, instead of feeling dated to a certain decade.

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When you opt for a sleeve tattoo, you have several considerations. Do you want your whole arm covered in tattoos, or just half or a quarter sleeve? Your tattoo artistcan help you best decide on the scale and placement of your sleeve tattoo. Some people start with just a few random placed tattoos and bridge them together later with a more significant piece. If you're just starting your sleeve idea, it's the right time to consider the final project and scale.


Today's the day, you're ready to commit, and you just know in your heart — it's tattoo time! Now you need help figuring out how to pick a full tattoo sleeve theme. I've been on a mission for Bustle, interviewing tattoo artists all over the Bay Area. My goal has been to learn more about tattoo sleeves so I can help ladies who are ready to go under the gun, but still need more information. I've covered what part of a tattoo sleeve hurts the most and facts to know before getting started. I wrote a piece answering how long does a full sleeve tattoo take and how to deal with aftercare. But I honestly think picking the theme is the most exciting part.

Ouch, what an adorable piece of artwork. Getting your arm tattooed in all one colour like that can be pretty painful. The needle penetrates pretty deep to keep the colour the same and it takes a while in the chair. This dramatic look is intense and a bit frightening. Would you choose all one colour like this? We do like how he shakes it up a bit with the geometric-like imagery.
Sacred geometry tattoos are spiritual in nature and have a religious significance, besides being of great aesthetic value. Most of the time, people have such a tattoo inked for its symbolic significance rather than its attraction and appeal. Different shapes in geometry are associated with different elements of nature which need to be understood well before choosing a tattoo design. For instance, the cube symbolizes the earth while fire is represented by the tetrahedron. Air is signified by the octahedron, water by icosahedron and spirit by dodecahedron. It is also said that having these tattoo shaped inked over special areas of the body will have a healing effect and restore good health and balance in the body. Perhaps, this is the reason why tattoos have been used as adornments in the form of talismans or amulets since the times immemorial. They have been revered for their magical qualities and have been used as a part of holistic healing therapies in the pasta nd this tradition has been carried on into the contemporary times too, making such tattoos a blend of beauty and spirituality. The belief is that placing the spiritual tattoos on a particular part of the body will have a positive impact on health and spirituality, which makes the placement of this an issue of vital importance.
Nowadays, tattoos have become a statement. Some people wear them merely as fashion accessories, to help them stand out from the crowd. This wasn’t always the case though. Tattoos have been around since ancient times, and they were used to protect the wearer or symbolize a spiritual connection with gods. Ideally, you should only go for tattoos that have a special meaning to you. That way, besides being attractive, tattoos can also be powerful, evocative, and even mystical. And if that’s what you’re looking for, sacred geometry tattoos might just be the perfect pick.

“It works! Awesome staff and spotless clean facility with parking lot. Like most, I had my consultation and then began my first treatment the same day. They allowed me to roll that first treatment in to a discounted purchase of 6 treatments up front. Keep in mind every tattoo is different. I understand this now that mine is fading and I can see where the heavy hand put more ink in than other areas. I am pleased with the results though I am not sure I will recognize myself once it is fully removed :-)”
Since tattoo removal is a personal option in most cases, most insurance carriers won’t cover the process unless it is medically necessary. Physicians or surgery centers practicing tattoo removal may also require payment in full on the day of the procedure. If you are considering tattoo removal, be sure to discuss associated costs up front and obtain all charges in writing before you undergo any treatment.
Although laser treatment is well known and often used to remove tattoos, unwanted side effects of laser tattoo removal include the possibility of discoloration of the skin such as hypopigmentation (white spots, more common in darker skin) and hyperpigmentation (dark spots) as well as textural changes - these changes are usually not permanent when the Nd:YAG is used but it is much more likely with the use of the 755 nm Alexandrite, the 694 nm Ruby and the R20 method. Very rarely, burns may result in scarring but this usually only occurs when patients don't care for the treated area properly. Occasionally, "paradoxical darkening" of a tattoo may occur, when a treated tattoo becomes darker instead of lighter. This occurs most often with white ink, flesh tones, pink, and cosmetic make-up tattoos.[53][54]

Your next treatment should be no sooner than 8 to 12 weeks.When you schedule an appointment with us, the laser immediately works its magic to break up the pigment. Thereafter your body is responsible for eliminating the ink. It does this as a natural process of metabolization and blood flow, but it needs 8 to 12 weeks to fully resolve targeted ink molecules.Each laser sessions breaks up only a certain amount of the tattoo, so you will need to return for successive treatments until the tattoo fully resolves.
If you've heard anything about laser removal, it's probably that it's insanely painful. I mean, if I had a nickel for every time I've heard, "Doesn't that hurt even more than actually getting the tattoos?" I'd be rich. (OK, I would have enough money to buy a medium iced coffee at Pret.) But while there's plenty of info on what to consider before getting a tattoo (and pages on pages of enticing inspo), there still isn't a whole lot of discussion surrounding the dark side of ink jobs: What happens if you grow to no longer love that little shooting star or random Latin phrase (ahem, see below)? I'm only about halfway through the process, but I've picked up plenty of tips along the way. So to do you all a solid, I put together a list of everything I've learned.
Tattoo sleeves are badass and totally eye-catching -- no one can deny that. Turning an entire arm or leg into a work of art requires some serious commitment and love for ink. In fact, we'd go so far as to argue that our arms or legs are the perfect canvas to be transformed into a piece of art. Our limbs are incredibly easy to hide, but also super easy to show off, arguably making tattoo sleeves the best spot to get inked. 
Historically finger tattoos get a bit of a bad wrap. Typically they use to be reserved for bikers and gang members, they also were considered a bit of a faux pas if you wanted to get a respectable job. Nowadays however they are more common place and socially acceptable. The traditional finger tattoos were to get “LOVE” on one hand and then “HATE” across the other knuckles, this was a design that was popularized by movie characters. Generally people will get either two four letter words across their knuckles or one eight or ten letter word across both of their hands.
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