Not all tattoos are created equal. “Black tattoos are easier to remove than brightly colored tattoos. Green and blue tend to be a little more challenging, and things like yellow, white, and purple are almost impossible to remove completely,” says Dr. Ibrahim. “Different wavelengths of laser target different colors in the skin,” says Dr. Bard. This is why multiple lasers are required for the successful removal of a multicolor tattoo—another reason to see a well-versed doctor for treatment. If you have laser removal done properly, you should see about 90 percent clearance on a tattoo, says Dr. Anolik. “You can’t be sure that you’re going to get 100 percent clearance on a tattoo, and that’s for a variety of reasons, including the type of ink and if [the tattoo] was done by a professional tattoo parlor," he says. "Professional tattoos tend to incorporate more colors and deposit more deeply into the dermis, making them more challenging." Amateur tattoos tend to be easier to remove, as they are often carbon-based, single-color, and placed more superficially. Dr. Ibrahim says the same goes for older tattoos, where the ink diffuses upward over time, making it easier to break up with a laser.
While we ensure the utmost safety, there are always risks with any cosmetic or corrective procedure received. For laser tattoo removal the severe risks include infection at the removal site, incomplete pigment removal, darkening of the skin in the treated area, whitening of the skin in the treated area and even scarring.Those with a history of keloid scars may develop a keloid post treatment. While we do offer treatment to resolve any keloids that may arise, these cannot be treated until tattoo removal sessions are fully satisfied.
Today, getting a tattoo is a no-brainer for many men. After all, some ink can be a seriously cool way to showcase your personality. But, while the choice to go under the needle may be easy, the decision of what exactly to get tattooed on your body and where can be challenging. To ensure you don’t end up regretting your tat in ten years’ time, it’s important to approach the process thoughtfully. To help you do so, we’ve created this ultimate guide filled with advice on how to choose the best tattoos for men.
I'm obsessed with my tattoo! Viet captured the design that was in my head so well, and it came out perfectly. This was my first tattoo, so I asked all kinds of questions about ink, sanitation, pain, etc. I'm that girl. Viet was super patient with me, let me know his awesome health code history (squeaky clean!), and answered all of my questions. His studio is a really clean, comfortable, stylish environment. My sister came with me and enjoyed herself watching The Avengers on his TV. Viet is an awesome guy who really knows how to take care of his clients. I'd recommend him to anyone and everyone! I couldn't be happier with my first tattoo or the experience of getting it!
A blacked out sleeve tattoo is done by an artist to either cover up an unwanted previous design, or throw in a bold statement to this prominent area of a person’s body. The entire arm is tattooed in black, or white can be added to make a delicate design as a part of the tattoo’s look. If it’s not covered up, a negative space can be left to create a rather unique design. Blackout sleeves won’t happen overnight. Plenty of sittings are involved in this painstakingly slow process, as well as the obvious pain that comes before and during healing. Getting a blacked out sleeve tattoo isn’t a quick fix, but rather, a tattoo decision that requires 100% of the artist and the client’s commitment.
Just got a tattoo done by Blink Tattoo on yesterday. It looks absolutely amazing. I've gotten a ton of compliments and everyone keeps asking where I went. The artist is very talented and professional. I like that he tries to make you comfortable (or as comfortable as you can be while getting a tat). Based on the previous reviews I was expecting a long wait so two months didn't seem too bad since I was mentally prepared for longer. I contacted him through email and always had fast responses. I definitely recommend Blink Tattoo as the best in Dallas to get inked.

1. Consider a doctor. I'd previously had one tattoo zapped at a spa (I was living in small-town Canada where there weren't plastic surgery offices or dermatologists), where an aesthetician used an outdated heat laser that ended up burning and scarring my skin. This time around, I'm having treatments done by Dr. John F. Adams at the New York Dermatology Group, where everything is done under medical supervision. I suggest you find your own doctor by asking friends, editors (shameless plug), and even by stopping people that you see with removal in process—which, yes, I have done.
In the early 1980s, a new clinical study began in Canniesburn Hospital's Burns and Plastic Surgery Unit, in Glasgow, Scotland, into the effects of Q-switched ruby laser energy on blue/black tattoos.[22][27] Further studies into other tattoo colours were then carried out with various degrees of success.[28] Research at the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow also showed that there was no detectable mutagenicity in tissues following irradiation with the Q-switched ruby laser.[29] This essentially shows that the treatment is safe, from a biological viewpoint, with no detectable risk of the development of cancerous cells.[30]
If you've heard anything about laser removal, it's probably that it's insanely painful. I mean, if I had a nickel for every time I've heard, "Doesn't that hurt even more than actually getting the tattoos?" I'd be rich. (OK, I would have enough money to buy a medium iced coffee at Pret.) But while there's plenty of info on what to consider before getting a tattoo (and pages on pages of enticing inspo), there still isn't a whole lot of discussion surrounding the dark side of ink jobs: What happens if you grow to no longer love that little shooting star or random Latin phrase (ahem, see below)? I'm only about halfway through the process, but I've picked up plenty of tips along the way. So to do you all a solid, I put together a list of everything I've learned.
Of course, geometric tattoos branch into the realms of sacred geometry, tribal history, and deep personal significance, so it's always worth doing some research before committing to a lifetime of ink, and the commentaries that accompany it. Personally, I'm of the opinion that whenever possible, it's best to have a custom piece designed for you, or to design your own work, if you're comfortable doing so (with the aid of your tattoo artist, if they're willing to help, because they're aware of what will and won't work on certain areas of the body, as well as what they're capable of creating at a professional level). Coming in with expectations to copy or rip off another artist's design will more than likely upset your tattoo artist, which you definitely want to avoid. Because like most professionals, your tattoo artist has integrity, and likely holds herself/himself to a very high standard — which usually includes respect for their work, and the work of other industry professionals.
From striking sleeve designs to geometric animal tattoos, we’ve compiled a list of impressive body art from around the world. We’ve included London-based tattoo artist Mowgli, whose sketch-like style combines ancient symbols, geometric shapes, and archaic engravings. Below, you’ll also find the mesmerizing mandala designs of LA-based Corey Divine who modifies the symbol by repeating angular shapes that expand and contract as the body moves. So, if you’re interested in getting a tattoo with deeper meaning, scroll down for some body art inspiration.
Sacred Geometry is possibly the most exciting recent trend in tattooing culture, given its departure from what most people consider a typical approach to tattooing, i.e figurative works. Dotwork tattoos have been steadily growing in popularity over the past decade or so, but the absorbing of such tattooing techniques into a methodically-planned system in the form of Sacred Geometry is something which is truly taking flight in the here and now. That being said, in actuality this is far from a recent phenomenon, and this is a big part of its significance and appeal. It’s said this tattooing tradition dates back to the time of the Pharaohs. Geometry has been drawn upon to provide knowledge for millennia too – architecture, for instance, is based on geometric visualising.
The half sleeve is generally the preferred style of arm tattoo at the moment. Unlike having a full sleeve it allows you to cover up your tattoos with a t-shirt should you need to for work or any other occasion. It also means that you don’t have to tattoo your elbow which can be a difficult area to work with and often you are restricted to the types of styles that you can get inked there.
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