Sleeve tattoos are a collaboration between a tattoo artist and customer to demonstrate a personal and unified artistic theme. Other times, a sleeve is created when a person has many smaller tattoos on their arm and later has them connected with background tattooing to form a sleeve. Planned sleeves generally require many long hours of tattooing and can take weeks, months or years to complete.

Kind of trippy, but gorgeous nonetheless. This is a type of tattoo that requires extensive skill so, again, pick the artist carefully. We can’t help but stress how important this is. The Internet is full of horror stories written by people who had bad experiences with unskilled artist, so it’s better to do your research than to become a cautionary tale.
The amount of time to get a full sleeve tattoo on your arm is completely subjective. The entire process, similar to the outcome itself, is highly subjective to plenty of variables. Factors that you must think about include the speed of the artist, the design, as well as your personal healing time. The main factor involved in how long will you be sitting on that tattoo chair is the complexity of the concept. Full sleeves that feature your traditional sailor-style tattoo artwork might take as little as 10 to 15 hours. Meanwhile, a photorealistic tattoo can take at least eighty hours to complete – Possibly even more.
Don’t expect to get a huge tattoo, or series of them, in just one sitting. They just take too long. Gualteros has some clients who fly in from overseas, and who then spend a few solid days getting big-scale tattoos completed. But that’s a special case. “Usually it’ll happen over more time,” he says. “It could take months, it could take years. Usually, you leave 3-4 weeks between appointments and a sleeve can require anywhere from 8-10 sessions.”
After it’s done peeling, you can start your long-term care plan: “Always use sunblock and body lotion,” says Gualteros. “Honestly, if a tattoo is properly done and properly taken care of, it should be good for life, without touch up. So long as there’s good foundation—that is, black and line work—it should look good over time.” If you don’t properly block the skin from the sun’s wear, or condition it daily, the colors will fade over time and will require a touching up. Considering you’ll be working with a full sleeve or more, it’s best to get in the habit of using sunblock and lotion.
Dowdell says that Celtic and tribal tattoos are on the way out (and those similar in design). You might associate them with muscled celebrities and athletes, and recognize them for their ornate patterns or scenery. A Celtic tattoo uses black ink to background crosses, trees, or folkloric animals. A tribal tattoo uses black ink to fill in spiraling, zigzagging arrows and lines, often migrating from the pec onto the shoulder and arm. The tricky thing about tattoos is that you still see the ones that are “out of style”, because they’re permanently on the wearer. So, Dowdell’s point is that he’s doing far fewer of these types anymore, in favor of the aforementioned ones. As seen on: The Rock’s shoulder and arm. (His is technically a Polynesian tattoo, but stylistically in the same vein.)
Those who don’t prefer huge designs could get this tattoo – No matter how small it is, it can still stand out thanks to the beautiful patterns surrounding it. These geometric tattoos don’t have to come in black-and-white – You can add just one pop of color, or even a whole rainbow of colors. A colorful geometric pattern tattoo is sure to look amazing on you.  
There are many reasons why Sacred Geometry tattoos are growing in importance in tattooing. Modern needles can achieve incredibly elaborate designs which allow people to extend interpretations of these shapes. The rise in the artistic status of graphic design is also a notable point, as they exist in a similar aesthetic field. But perhaps the key underlying motive driving all of this is a striving towards spirituality in an increasingly digitised, socially-atomised world. As traditional aspects of life and work become seemingly ever more fleeting, it’s not difficult to see how a permanent connection to the laws that govern nature becomes mightily appealing indeed.
Nature is full of geometry, and spirituality has always been fascinated by this hidden secret. Sacred geometry is used in religious architecture (and for all religions), with concepts observed in natural patterns, as well as in art. With the growth of dotwork, aka pointillism tattoos, geometric tattoos has soon moved from meaningless ornamental tattoos to masterpieces with deeper meanings. Ink lovers getting sacred geometry tattoos are following the traditions of holistic practice, when shamans and monks were the only ones tattooing. Depending on their placement and design, they believe that their tattoos could affect their health, spirituality and energy.
5. Get ready for needles. Mentally prepare for visits to consist of more than just a quick and easy laser moment. Mine have been taking about 45 minutes because we take before photos, clean the areas, inject them with lidocaine for freezing, laser them, ice them, and then bandage them. Oh, and sometimes a weird thing happens where I taste metal when the laser hits my skin. Dr. Adams says it's a sensation that some people experience when the lidocaine is hit by the laser and [that it] is totally normal…but also, I might be superhuman.
These days’ tattoos are growing in popularity, it’s as if more people have them then don’t at this point. People want to be able to put a statement about their lives and these usually use their bodies as a canvas to do so. It’s a style choice for most people, nothing different from adding an accessory to an outfit. It’s not only reflects their style but their personality as well.
If you're harboring any fear of commitment, it's going to come to surface when the time comes to decide on a tattoo. This goes without saying but when you’re going to ink yourself permanently—whether it’s a micro tat or a full sleeve—you're gonna want to get it right. Maybe you know what you want, but don’t know the best execution—something that will look good in 5, 10, or 40 years.
Geometric tattoos are probably one of the most trending designs from the last couple of years. They look great, are timeless and not too expensive. Above is an example of a silver and black one on the forearm, which is a very popular spot for people to get tattoos now that they’re more socially acceptable and not necessarily restricted to areas that you need to cover up anymore.
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