Sleeve tattoos are one of the most popular tattoo designs in the world over, as they look both beautiful and prominent. Like the sleeve of a garment, they cover the area from the shoulder to the wrist, though some designs may be half sleeved or quarter sleeved. These designs combine a large number of smaller designs, which make creating them a difficult and time-consuming task, but the effort is truly worth the while.
If you know that eventually you want a full sleeve, then Gualteros advises coming up with the full-arm design ahead of time, instead of starting off with just a few sporadic tattoo ideas. This is true for both tribal-style tattoos as well as a series of more random, disconnected ones. “When you’re working with a blank canvas, you can really think through the entire composition to make it cohesive,” he says. “If you’re working with existing tattoos, you just have to try to make it as seamless as possible.”
Cambodia has a rich history and very ancient temples, it also has beautiful looking characters and words. As such it has become quite popular for people to get tattooed when they travel to Cambodia. It became even more in the last decade since Hollywood actress Angelina Jolie went under the gun with a Khmer style tattoo on her back and since then many have copied this style.
Tattoos have been used by many cultures a right of passage and a way of expression. Tattoos have also been used as a warrior mark that identifies a gang or a tribe. Sleeve tattoos carry deep meaning and symbolism.  The portrait is on point and the entire piece is just rad. The feather, the bird, those eyes on the guy…Geeze, this artist is incredible. Then you scroll down and see that gnarly piece that’s so descriptive and awesome. It’s so hard to nail a portrait yet this guy makes it look easy.
Generally speaking, geometric tattoos tend to draw from shapes and patterns in the natural world. Some symbols, like the ones above, are associated with deeper religious and cultural backgrounds. Among the basic shapes, circles can portray relationships and community, and square-based designs stand for stability. Combining or connecting them is a way to convey balance between the two. More intricate figures, such as a dodecahedron (three-dimensional shape with 12 plane faces) or icosahedron (with 20 plane faces) may show the juxtaposition of complexity and unity.
Leave the colors to the artist. Hamlet suggests not bringing in a fully rendered drawing of the image and colors you want. The more I interview tattoo artists, the more I am coming to understand that getting a tattoo is like commissioning an artist to paint a mural. You do own the building, but you don't hand the artist a photo of another artist's mural and tell them to replicate it for you. Instead, you say your building works for peace and you want a mural that conveys that message and that you especially love lily of the valley flowers and the image of the rising sun. Then you let the artist do what they do: Create some art!
Viet was amazing. So nice and very easy to talk to and let him know my ideas. He's not judgmental but will also help if you have questions or concerns. He's a true artist, no doubt! He sketched my idea, let me pick a movie to watch on his HUGE tv, and my fiance entertained himself with the fun games Viet had lying around! Even the guests not getting tattooed can have fun!

Sacred Geometry is possibly the most exciting recent trend in tattooing culture, given its departure from what most people consider a typical approach to tattooing, i.e figurative works. Dotwork tattoos have been steadily growing in popularity over the past decade or so, but the absorbing of such tattooing techniques into a methodically-planned system in the form of Sacred Geometry is something which is truly taking flight in the here and now. That being said, in actuality this is far from a recent phenomenon, and this is a big part of its significance and appeal. It’s said this tattooing tradition dates back to the time of the Pharaohs. Geometry has been drawn upon to provide knowledge for millennia too – architecture, for instance, is based on geometric visualising.


The term "sleeve" is a reference to the tattoo's size similarity in coverage to a long shirt sleeve on an article of clothing. In this manner, the term is also used as a verb; for example, "getting sleeved" means to have one's entire arm tattooed. The term is also sometimes used in reference to a large leg tattoo that covers a person's leg in a similar manner[citation needed].

Card symbols have long been popular symbols to get inked. The ace of spades is usually the most popular one to get but not far behind are the Queens. The queen of clubs symbolises a strong willed and positive person. Tattoos in between the fingers usually need to get redone every few years as they do fade due to the amount of rubbing that occurs there.
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